First Update of the New Aquarium

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My Occellaris Clownfish, otherwise known as Sharkbait is thoroughly enjoying his new home. It’s been 5 days since I upgraded from my little 5 gallon aquarium to the new 13 gallon widescreen. I used as much of the water from the old tank as I could without stressing out any of the life living in it at the time to help boost the nitrogen cycle versus waiting for nature to take its normal course, yes I was impatient which is not a good characteristic when taking on the Saltwater hobby. I also used some of the sand from the established tank mixed in with the new live sand as well taking a portion of the old foam filtration and putting it into my new filter, thus introducing more of the bacteria needed for the new tank to cycle. Once the tank was for sure at the same salinity 1.025 and same temperature of 80 degrees I then transferred a few pieced of live rock with the less vulnerable life on it into the new tank to get the natural filtration process started.

As of today my impatience mixed in with knowledge of the nitrogen cycle and basic knowledge of the saltwater aquarium has led to success thus far. Everything is happy and thriving stress free. Sharkbait at first intimidated by the increase in current and skeptical of the amount of space now given to him has since perked up and is now happily exploring the rest of the aquarium no longer afraid to cross the current.

It is now even more apparent how well the Feather Duster has been doing as now I can see even more of the new baby feather dusters being produced and sprouted up everywhere. I have also since discovered two developments of sponges, one appearing to be a yellow ball sponge tucked away in the crevices beneath my feather duster and another cropping up on another surrounded by the pretty coralline algae. I have also come to discover the coralline algae has begun to spread a little, thankfully! I look forward to watching that beautiful purple spread.

George the emerald crab is still happily tucked away in his cave using the mini carpet anemone as his protector. I await the time he decides to venture out and fine my purposely placed hair algae covered rock. I know he loves to munch on the stuff now he just needs to put some work in before the stuff tries to plague the new tank. Speaking of plague I did my best to rid my rocks of the Caullerpa algae that once consumed my smaller tank. Although this is taken as a good sign it also a very invasive species and can actually be considered illegal to bring across state lines or to release in local water sources. There is a small chunk left that I am curious to watch more closely, if pruned regularly it can be a welcome addition to a tank though I’m not sure I’m up for the maintenance required.

Anyways there is much more I could continue to rant on about but I will get to those in later posts.